What Are The Terms Of 1900 Buganda Agreement

The agreement was negotiated by Alfred Tucker, Bishop of Uganda,[5] and signed, among others, by Katikiro Apollo Kagwa of Buganda on behalf of Kabaka (Daudi Cwa II), who was then a child, and Sir Harry Johnston on behalf of the British colonial government. The Kingdom of Uganda is subject to the same customs regulations, the same regulations on porters, etc., which can be introduced with the consent of His Majesty for the Ugandan protectorate in general, which in a certain sense may be called external taxation, but no internal taxation other than the hut tax may be imposed on the indigenous peoples of the province of Uganda without the consent of the Kabaka. who is guided in this matter by the majority of the votes of his home counsel. Done at Mengo, Kingdom of Uganda, 10 March 1900. The Uganda Agreement of 1900 (See Indigenous Agreement and Indigenous Laws of Buganda, Laws of [9] However, according to the Ugandan Convention of 1900, Kabaka was only required to respond to this advice in the event of implementation of the Lukiiko Resolutions. Relations between Kabaka, the protectorate government and their ministers deteriorated and, due to the governor`s limited power under the 1900 agreement to impose his advice on Kabaka, the reorganization led to a steady decline in the influence that the protectorate government could exert in Buganda. [9] The Kingdom of Uganda is subject to the same customs regulations, the same regulations on carriers, etc., which can be introduced with His Majesty`s consent for the Ugandan protectorate in general, which in a sense can be called an external tax, but no other national tax, other than the protection tax, is imposed on the indigenous peoples of the province of Uganda without Kabaka`s consent. which, in this case, is based on the majority of votes in the original council. The agreement was negotiated by Alfred Tucker, Bishop of Uganda,[5] and signed, among others, by Katikiro Apollo Kagwa on behalf of Kabaka (Daudi Cwa II), then a small child, and Sir Harry Johnston on behalf of the British colonial government. In 1935, Sir Philip Mitchell arrived in Uganda as governor, having served in Tanganyika sixteen years earlier. He was convinced that relations between Uganda and the Protecting Power should be of a different character from that between the local authorities and the Government of Tanganyika.

[9] Recognizing that early protectorate officials had produced a pattern of growing distrust and clandestine change, Mitchell devised a plan to reform and reshape the system between the Protectorate and Buganda governments. [10] Considering that the relationship between the protectorate government and the Buganda indigenous government was one of a protected rather than indirect regime, he planned to replace the post of provincial commissioner of Buganda with a resident and remove officials from the central district, assuming that the Kabaka would be obliged to follow the advice of the resident and his staff. [9] However, under the Uganda Agreement of 1900, the Kabaka was only required to respond to this advice if the Lukiiko resolutions were implemented. Relations between the Kabaka, the Protectorate government and its ministers deteriorated, and due to the governor`s limited power under the 1900 agreement to impose his council on Kabaka, the reorganization led to a steady decline in the influence that the Protectorate government could exert in Buganda. [9] 20. If, during the first two years after the signing of this Agreement, the Kingdom of Uganda does not pay to the Administration of Uganda an amount of internal taxation equal to half of what is due in relation to the number of inhabitants; or if he does not pay at any time without valid reason or excuse, the above-mentioned minimum level of taxation due in relation to the population; or should the Kabaka, the chiefs or the People of Uganda at all times pursue a clearly unfair policy towards the British protectorate; Her Majesty`s Government will no longer be bound by the terms of this Agreement. .